Monday, March 9, 2020

Sponsor Letter, March 9th 2020

Dear Sponsors,

This will be a short note because . . . oh my . . . is work busy right now.  But, mostly in a good way.  I'm rushing to get ready for the sheetrock at the new building, as well as getting the plans in place for our big event with N. K. Jemisin next month.  Speaking of that event, I've got some information and a question for you.

Information first.  The seating at the event is not going to be assigned, so it'll be first-come, first-seated.  In light of that, we'll be letting sponsors and their guests in a half-hour early at 5:30 pm.  That'll give you plenty of time to get good seats and such.  But -- because of the size and complexity of the event, we won't be able to check names against a list of sponsors.  So, make sure you have your sponsor card.  You can just flash that at the door and we'll whisk you right in (along with however many friends you brought with you).  If you don't have your card (or, can't find it), no problem.  You can stop by the store anytime to get a replacement _or_ you can drop me a line (by replying to this email) and we'll mail a copy out to you.

And now, the question.  Despite talking with some expert friends of mine, I've been having a hard time figuring out just how serious and bad Coronavirus (COVID-19) is going to be.  It seems that it might be more contagious than the usual flu and the case-mortality rate certainly seems to be higher as well.

Actually, it's more accurate that I'm trying to figure out how seriously _I_ should take it since it's obviously not possible for anyone to know how serious it's going to be.  So, here's what I'm wondering -- relative to that, what steps should I take with Borderlands and when should I take them?  The biggest question is, at what point (if any) should I cancel the event with N. K. Jemisin?  The lesser question is when (and if) should I close up the shop; at some point; for some period of time?

As sponsors, you've a vested interest in Borderlands, which is why I'm asking for your opinions.  Further, based on my personal knowledge and relationships with many of you, our sponsors are a very smart and broadly educated group.  All the other times I've asked you all for advice, I've gotten some truly valuable information so I'd be a fool not to ask you about this.  So, let me know what you think.  You can reply to this email or you can email me directly at abeatts@borderlands-books.com.

Warmest Regards,
Alan

Upcoming Events -

The Arroyo Abrilongo <https://www.portugalist.com/smallest-international-bridge/> bridge version:

(1) Sunday, March 22nd at 3:00 pm -- Chana Porter reading from and signing THE SEEP

(2) Sunday, March 29th at 6:30 pm  -- SF in SF with author Dominica Phetteplace at American Bookbinders Museum

(3) Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsors' General Meeting [Sponsors and Guests only]

(4) Thursday, April 2nd at 7:00 pm (Doors at 5:30 pm for sponsors, 6:00 pm for the public), Castro Theatre -- N.K. Jemisin, reading from and signing THE CITY WE BECAME

(5) Saturday, April 4th at 3:00 pm -- Max Barry reading and signing PROVIDENCE

(6) Saturday, May 9th at 3:00 pm -- Maggie Tokuda-Hall signing for THE MERMAID, THE WITCH, AND THE SEA, in conversation with Annalee Newitz.


The King Fahd Causeway <http://www.bahraincustoms.gov.bh/king_causeway.php> version:

(1) Sunday, March 22nd at 3:00 pm -- Chana Porter reading from and signing THE SEEP.  We are delighted to welcome Chana Porter to Borderlands Books for their debut novel, THE SEEP.  This new utopian novel eschews sci-fi tropes and will keep you glued to every twist and turn.  From the publishers' website: "Chana Porter is a playwright, teacher, MacDowell Colony fellow, and co-founder of The Octavia Project, a STEM and fiction-writing program for girls and gender non-conforming youth from underserved communities.  She lives in Brooklyn, New York, and is currently at work on her next novel."

(2) Sunday, March 29th, 6:30 pm -- SF in SF with author Dominica Phetteplace at American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina St, San Francisco, CA  -- (Suggested donation $10.)  Doors and bar at 6:00 pm, event begins at 6:30 pm.  We're so happy to participate in the Science Fiction in San Francisco reading series!  This month we're joined by the fabulous Dominica Phetteplace!  The author will read a selection from her work, followed by Q&A from the audience moderated by Terry Bisson.  The author will schmooze & sign books after.  Books will be available for sale.  Seating is limited, so first come, first seated.  Bar proceeds benefit the American Bookbinders Museum.  Questions? Email sfinsfevents@gmail.com.

(3) Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsors' General Meeting [Sponsors and Guests only].  Join us for a recap of the prior year and our goals for the upcoming year, including the status of our move to Haight Street.

(4) Thursday, April 2nd, 7:00 pm, Castro Theatre (Doors at 5:30 pm for sponsors, 6:00 pm for the public) -- Borderlands Books is pleased and excited to host N.K. Jemisin, the three-time Hugo Award winning and NYT Bestselling author of The Broken Earth Trilogy (The Fifth Season, The Obelisk Gate, and The Stone Sky), at the historic Castro Theater!

TICKETS <https://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4526884>
Her most recent novel is The City We Became; "Five New Yorkers must come together to defend their city from an ancient evil in this stunning new novel. Every great city has a soul.  Some are as ancient as myths, and others are as new and destructive as children.  New York City?  She's got six.  But every city also has a dark side.  A roiling, ancient evil stirs in the halls of power, threatening to destroy the city and her six newborn avatars unless they can come together and stop it once and for all."
Ms. Jemisin will present a reading from her new novel and then answer questions from the audience.  Afterwards, she will be available to sign a limited number of copies of her work, which will be available for sale at the event.
A Note About Ticket Prices
Due to the number of people who would like to attend this event, Borderlands has chosen to rent a larger venue than the bookstore.  As a result, we are asking for a suggested donation of $20 to help cover the associated costs.  However, no one will be turned away for lack of funds.  If $20 is beyond your budget, please choose one of the lower ticket prices.  Or, if even $10 is too much, please arrive at the event and donate what you can.  As long as there are available seats, everyone is welcome.  After our costs have been recovered, the excess funds will be retained to allow Borderlands to host events of this size in the future.

(5) Saturday, April 4 at 3:00 pm -- Max Barry reading and signing PROVIDENCE -- We are happy to welcome Max Barry to Borderlands!  Max is the author of LEXICON, MACHINE MAN, and many other novels, but this current one may be his most inventive yet.  From the publisher: "Seven years after first contact, Providence Five launches.  It is an enormous and deadly warship, built to protect humanity from its greatest ever threat.  On board is a crew of just four -- tasked with monitoring the ship and reporting the war's progress to a mesmerized global audience by way of social media.  But while pursuing the enemy across space, Gilly, Talia, Anders, and Jackson confront the unthinkable: their communications are cut, their ship decreasingly trustworthy and effective.  To survive, they must win a fight that is suddenly and terrifyingly real."

(6) Saturday, May 9th at 3:00 pm -- Maggie Tokuda-Hall signing THE MERMAID, THE WITCH, AND THE SEA, in conversation with Annalee Newitz.  Please join us for another entertaining adventure with local favorite Maggie Tokuda-Hall, who will be thrilling us with her latest work (and first novel)!  From the publisher: "The pirate Florian, born Flora, has always done whatever it takes to survive -- including sailing under false flag on the Dove as a marauder, thief, and worse.  Lady Evelyn Hasegawa, a highborn Imperial daughter, is on board as well --accompanied by her own casket. But Evelyn's one-way voyage to an arranged marriage in the Floating Islands is interrupted when the captain and crew show their true colors and enslave their wealthy passengers.  Both Florian and Evelyn have lived their lives by the rules, and whims, of others. But when they fall in love, they decide to take fate into their own hands --no matter the cost.  Maggie Tokuda-Hall's sweeping fantasy, full of stolen memories, illicit mermaid's blood, double agents, and haunting mythical creatures, conjures an extraordinary cast of characters and the unforgettable story of a couple striving to stay together in the face of myriad forces wishing to control their identities and destinies." Maggie will be in conversation with local author, journalist, and podcaster Annalee Newitz!

Monday, February 3, 2020

Sponsor Letter, February 3rd 2020

Dear Sponsors,

I've got some great news -- though it's taken a bit longer than it did last year, we hit 300 sponsors for 2020 exactly one week ago!  So, we're certainly going to be open for the rest of this year.  Right now the sponsor count is at 310 and I do hope that it will continue to rise.  By way of comparison, we had 547 sponsors last year and 639 the year before.  My sincere thanks to all of you who have renewed.  As I've said at least five times before -- without you we wouldn't be here.

Last month I wrote that the sponsor program (and the trust you've placed in me) is something that I really appreciate.  I didn't have space or time last month to explain in detail but I'll try to do it now.

Five years ago, the idea of sponsorships allowed us to keep Borderlands open.  That, all alone, was truly remarkable.  Over the years you've heard from me and from others on the staff what that meant to us personally.  And I hope that you've read some of the news articles about what we accomplished and how it's been an inspiration for other small businesses.

But, in all that time, I haven't described the series of effects that have rippled out from that original accomplishment.  Perhaps "rippled" isn't the right term. It's been more like dominos falling.

The first domino was the way sponsorships made me think about the business differently.  Instead of being my private domain, that I could do with what I wished, I came to see it as something more like a public trust.  Something that you had given me control over; for the benefit of not just me, or the staff, but for all of you.  And, further, for all of our customers and our customers-to-be.

That meant that I had an obligation to figure out how to keep Borderlands operating for as long as possible.  Which caused the next domino to fall when I realized that the only way to have a fighting chance of staying open for decades was to buy a building to house the shop.

But that realization wouldn't have meant much were it not for your continuing support.  All together, you have given more than just the minimum that was necessary to keep the store open. That minimum has always been 300 sponsors.  Yet, every year, many more people than that have chosen to support us.  I'll not list all the numbers here but we have never had less than 500 sponsors and most years it's been over 600.

That greater-than-required support allowed me to save enough money that the idea of making a down-payment for a building wasn't utterly impossible . . . it was just mostly improbable. And so I went looking.  For almost two years.  I made several offers on buildings but none of them worked out.  Until I ran across our building on Haight St.

And then the next domino fell.  As it turned out, the down payment I had put aside wasn't really enough and, further, getting a mortgage was (pretty much) out of the question.  Inspired by, once again, the support you had given me, I decided to try borrowing the money from our customers.  Starting with you, our sponsors.

As you know, it worked.

And that's when the most recent domino fell.  I realized that, with a building secured, it would be possible for Borderlands to not just continue for decades but continue long after I'm gone. Hence my plan to create a non-profit, the purpose of which will be to take over the operations (and assets) of Borderlands -- either when I just can't manage the store anymore or when I'm not around to do the job.  (I'll go into detail about that plan in the regular store newsletter this month, if you're interested in details).

So, there it is.  From "What the hell! Maybe we can stay open," to "We're going to make a bookstore that will last for 100 years".  It's been a long, weird trip and I'm very happy you've come along for the ride.  This year is going to a notable one -- I hope you'll continue to support us as we swing into the home stretch.

Warmest Regards,
Alan

PS If you haven't renewed your sponsorship yet, I'd sure appreciate it if you would.  This is going to be a damn expensive year and we can use the help.  You can renew on-line at https://borderlands-books.com/buysponsorship.html  Or feel free to stop by the store, or give us a call to renew in person.

On the other hand, if money is tight, please let me know.  This year, just like every year, we have some "scholarships" that were paid for by your fellow sponsors.  One of the reasons for them is to allow sponsors to keep participating, even when cash is in short supply.

- Upcoming Events -

The Silica House Version <https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/scientists-have-built-worlds-smallest-house-180969149/> :

Saturday, February 8th at 3:00 pm -- Juliette Wade, signing for MAZES OF POWER with Deborah J. Ross

Saturday, February 8th at 7:30 pm -- Writers With Drinks (at The Make Out Room, 3225 22nd Street, San Francisco) with authors Tracy Clark Flory, Aaron Glantz, Meng Jin, Barbara Tomash, Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu, hosted by Charlie Jane Anders

Tuesday, February 11th at 6:00 pm -- Sarah Gailey, signing for UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED, in conversation with Meg Elison

Saturday, February 22nd at 5:00 pm -- Katharine Kerr, signing for SWORD OF FIRE

Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books [Sponsors and Guests only]

Sunday, February 23rd at 6:00 pm -- SF in SF (at The American Bookbinders' Museum, 355 Clementina Street, San Francisco) with Mike Chen, Tiffany Trent, and Juliette Wade, moderated by Terry Bisson

Saturday, February 29th at 6:00 pm -- Seanan McGuire, signing for COME TUMBLING DOWN and IMAGINARY NUMBERS

Friday, March 6th -8th -- FOGCon in Walnut Creek

Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsors' General Meeting [Sponsors and Guests only]

Thursday, April 2nd, time TBA -- N.K. Jemisin, reading and signing THE CITY WE BECAME.

Saturday, May 9th -- Maggie Tokuda-Hall signing for THE MERMAID, THE WITCH, AND THE SEA, in conversation with Annalee Newitz.

The Antilia Version <https://www.architecturaldigest.in/content/mukesh-ambani-antilia-home-mumbai/#s-cust0> :

Saturday, February 8th at 3:00 pm -- Juliette Wade, MAZES OF POWER - We're delighted to welcome local author Juliette Wade, showing off her debut novel MAZES OF POWER! From the book description: "The cavern city of Pelismara has stood for a thousand years. The Great Families of the nobility cling to the myths of their golden age while the city's technology wanes.  When a fever strikes, and the Eminence dies, seventeen-year-old Tagaret is pushed to represent his Family in the competition for Heir to the Throne. To win would give him the power to rescue his mother from his abusive father, and marry the girl he loves. But the struggle for power distorts everything in this highly stratified society, and the fever is still loose among the inbred, susceptible nobles. Tagaret's sociopathic younger brother, Nekantor, is obsessed with their family's success.  Nekantor is willing to exploit Tagaret, his mother, and her new servant Aloran to defeat their opponents.  Can he be stopped?  Should he be stopped?  And will they recognize themselves after the struggle has changed them?"  Join us to meet this up-and-coming author who is soon to be a superstar!  Juliette will be in conversation with author Deborah J. Ross.

Saturday, February 8th at 7:30 pm -- Writers With Drinks (at The Make Out Room, 3225 22nd Street, San Francisco) with authors Tracy Clark Flory, Aaron Glantz, Meng Jin, Barbara Tomash, Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu, hosted by Charlie Jane Anders - Writers With Drinks is the most awesome spoken-word variety show in the world, hosted by the incredible Charlie Jane Anders, and we're always happy to participate!  The amazing lineup this month includes Tracy Clark Flory, Aaron Glantz, Meng Jin, Barbara Tomash, Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu! Cost: $5 to $20, no-one turned away for lack of funds.  All proceeds benefit local non-profits.  Doors open at 7:00 and Borderlands will be on hand to sell books. http://www.writerswithdrinks.com/

Tuesday, February 11th at 6:00 pm -- Sarah Gailey, signing for UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED,  in conversation with Meg Elison - We couldn't be more excited to welcome Sarah Gailey, who will be showing off their brand-new novella UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED!  Jude can't stop raving about this book and we're convinced you'll love it, too.  Here's the description from the publisher: "Esther is a stowaway. She's hidden herself away in the Librarian's book wagon in an attempt to escape the marriage her father has arranged for her -- a marriage to the man who was previously engaged to her best friend.  Her best friend who she was in love with.  Her best friend who was just executed for possession of resistance propaganda.  The future American Southwest is full of bandits, fascists, and queer librarian spies on horseback trying to do the right thing."  Join us to meet Sarah and hear all about your next favorite book!  Sarah will be in conversation with local author (and Philip K. Dick Award winner) Meg Elison.

Saturday, February 22nd at 5:00 pm -- Katharine Kerr, SWORD OF FIRE - We're always happy to welcome the beloved Katharine Kerr to Borderlands! She's back with the first a new trilogy that will re-introduce readers to Deverry!  From the book description: "The bards are the people's voice -- and their sword.  All over the kingdom of Deverry, the common people are demanding reform of the corrupt law courts.  In Aberwyn, the situation catches fire when Gwerbret Ladoic, second in authority only to the High King, allows a bard to starve to death rather than hear their grievances.  Guildwoman Alyssa, a student at the local scholars' collegium, and Lady Dovina, the gwerbret's own daughter, know that evidence exists to overthrow the so-called traditional legal system, if they can only get it into the right hands. The powerful lords will kill anyone who threatens their privileges.  To retrieve the proof, Alyssa must make a dangerous journey that will either change her life forever -- or end it."  Don't miss this near-legendary author who is at the height of her creative powers right now!

Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm --  Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books.  [Sponsors and Guests only] Join us for food, drink, and merriment as we talk about books, buy books, and maybe even win some free books in the raffle!  This is our first sponsor social of 2020, and we hope you'll come by to meet fellow sponsors and toast the absolutely incredible fact that YOU made it possible for the store to survive.  We've got some great advance reading copies to give away and we're going to have a good time!  Bring your favorite treat or drink to share, be super-social, or simply find a book and a quiet corner to commune -- we're just delighted to have you.

Sunday, February 23rd at 6:00 pm -- SF in SF (at The American Bookbinders' Museum, 355 Clementina Street, San Francisco) with Mike Chen, Tiffany Trent, and Juliette Wade, moderated by Terry Bisson --  (Suggested donation $10.)  Doors and bar at 6:00 pm, event begins at 6:30 pm.  We're so happy to participate in the Science Fiction in San Francisco reading series!  This month we're joined by the fabulous Mike Chen, Tiffany Trent, and Juliette Wade.  The authors will read a selection from their work, followed by Q&A from the audience moderated by Terry Bisson.  Authors will schmooze & sign books after. Books will be available for sale.  Seating is limited, so first come, first seated.  Bar proceeds benefit the American Bookbinders Museum. Questions?  Email sfinsfevents@gmail.com.  More info at www.sfinsf.org

Saturday, February 29th at 6:00 pm -- Seanan McGuire, COME TUMBLING DOWN and IMAGINARY NUMBERS  - One of the hardest working authors in genre fiction today, Seanan McGuire is back with not one but two new books!  From the publisher: "The fifth installment in New York Times bestselling author Seanan McGuire's award-winning Wayward Children series, COME TUMBLING DOWN picks up the threads left dangling by EVERY HEART A DOORWAY and DOWN AMONG THE STICKS AND BONES.  When Jack left Eleanor West's School for Wayward Children she was carrying the body of her deliciously deranged sister -- whom she had recently murdered in a fit of righteous justice -- back to their home on the Moors. But death in their adopted world isn't always as permanent as it is here, and when Jack is herself carried back into the school, it becomes clear that something has happened to her.   Something terrible.  Something of which only the maddest of scientists could conceive.  Something only her friends are equipped to help her overcome.  Eleanor West's "No Quests" rule is about to be broken. Again."  From the publisher of IMAGINARY NUMBERS: "The ninth book in the fast-paced InCryptid urban fantasy series returns to the mishaps of the Price family, eccentric cryptozoologists who safeguard the world of magical creatures living in secret among humans.  Sarah Zellaby has always been in an interesting position.  Adopted into the Price family at a young age, she's never been able to escape the biological reality of her origins: she's a cuckoo, a telepathic ambush predator closer akin to a parasitic wasp than a human being. Friend, cousin, mathematician; it's never been enough to dispel the fear that one day, nature will win out over nurture, and everything will change.  Maybe that time has finally come."  We're always delighted to welcome Seanan and we sincerely hope you'll join us!

Friday, March 6-8 -- FOGCon in Walnut Creek.  Once again we will be setting up shop at the Walnut Creek Marriott for the 10th (!) FOGCon.  This year's featured guests include Mary Anne Mohanraj and Nisi Shawl.  Find more details and register here: https://fogcon.org/

Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsor General Meeting [Sponsors and Guests only].  Join us for a recap of the prior year and our goals for the upcoming year, including the status of our move to Haight Street.

Thursday, April 2nd, time TBA -- N.K. Jemisin, reading and signing THE CITY WE BECAME -  We are truly pleased to host the three-time Hugo winning author of The Broken Earth Trilogy.  This event will take place at a local theater venue and there will be a suggested donation of $20 to help offset the rental costs.  However, no one will be turned away due to lack of funds.  There will be advance tickets and we will be sending out a special notice when they are available.  Sponsors will have preferred seating (details to come).  Please come join us for what may be our biggest event ever.

Saturday, May 9th at 3:00 pm -- Maggie Tokuda-Hall signing THE MERMAID, THE WITCH, AND THE SEA, in conversation with Annalee Newitz.  Please join us for another entertaining adventure with local favorite Maggie Tokuda-Hall, who will be thrilling us with her latest work (and first novel)!  From the publisher: "The pirate Florian, born Flora, has always done whatever it takes to survive -- including sailing under false flag on the Dove as a marauder, thief, and worse.  Lady Evelyn Hasegawa, a highborn Imperial daughter, is on board as well --accompanied by her own casket. But Evelyn's one-way voyage to an arranged marriage in the Floating Islands is interrupted when the captain and crew show their true colors and enslave their wealthy passengers.  Both Florian and Evelyn have lived their lives by the rules, and whims, of others. But when they fall in love, they decide to take fate into their own hands --no matter the cost.  Maggie Tokuda-Hall's sweeping fantasy, full of stolen memories, illicit mermaid's blood, double agents, and haunting mythical creatures, conjures an extraordinary cast of characters and the unforgettable story of a couple striving to stay together in the face of myriad forces wishing to control their identities and destinies." Maggie will be in conversation with local author, journalist, and podcaster Annalee Newitz!

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Sponsor Letter, January 7th 2020

Hi Everyone and Happy New Year!

I hope that your holidays were good and that 2020 is treating you very well thus far.  At the shop we've all been catching our breath (and catching some sleep . . . finally).  Looking back, 2019 really was one hell of a year.  It actually had all the earmarks of being a pretty awful one (starting with Cary's death last January and continuing from there) but, surprisingly, none of us feel like it was.  Hard, sure, and tiring, without a doubt, but not awful.  I hope that you can say (at the very least) the same.  Looking forward into 2020 it's seeming like it's going to be another hard one but, I hope, in a positive way rather than in a difficult one.

As I've mentioned here before, we have a self-imposed deadline to be open at the new building and selling books there by May 25th at the very latest.  Making that deadline is going to take a lot of work but I'm (pretty) confident we'll make it.  Granted, I'm willing to accept that "open and selling books" might mean a functioning rest-room and me at a card-table piled with books on the sidewalk, but I think we can do better than that.  Check out the regular store newsletter (arriving in your mail box very soon) for more details about our moving plans and such-like.

This year we're also going to be losing a member of our staff - Dave Fitzgerald is going to be heading out of SF for Eureka.  He and his wife have found a lovely little house up there so; they've decided to stop making their landlord rich in favor of owning a home and being able to pay more attention to their writing. We're damn sad to see Dave go; he's a hell of a fine bookseller on top of fitting in well with the rest of the inmates at The Borderlands Home for Those Who Read Too Much.  It's looking like he'll be splitting at the end of February.  I've got a bit more to say about that in a moment, but first there's an expected piece of business I need to mention . . . .

With the beginning of the year, it's time for sponsorship renewals.  Things are looking good so far, in as much as we already have 186 (give or take) sponsors for 2020.  But, as always, we need to reach 300 by March 31st if we're going to stay open.  So, if you feel like continuing to support our shop and our vision of what a bookstore can be, now is a good time to renew.  You can do so online at https://borderlands-books.com/buysponsorship.html .  You're also welcome to renew in person at the store (and, we always love to see you when you come by).  Finally, if you'd like to renew by mail (and, in case you're wondering, yes, people do still do that!), please feel free to send a check to:  866 Valencia St.  SF  CA 94110.  Sponsorship continues to be $100 per person for the year.  I truly appreciate your trust and support over all these years.  I'll have a bit more to say about that next month but I don't want to take up too much space in this note because . . . .

(OMITTED FROM BLOG)

All Best,
Alan

Upcomming Sponsor (and other) Events

The Fairyfly Version:

Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  --  Astronomy Lecture, Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park

Sunday, January 12th at 6:30 pm -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina St. San Francisco) with authors Cecelia Holland and Kim Stanley Robinson

Saturday, February 8th at 3:00 pm -- Juliet Wade, signing for MAZES OF POWER with Deborah J. Ross

Saturday, February 8th at 7:30 pm -- Writers With Drinks (at The Make Out Room, 3225 22nd Street, San Francisco) with authors Tracy Clark Flory, Barbara Tomash,  Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu

Tuesday, February 11th at 6:00 pm -- Sarah Gailey, signing for UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED

Saturday, February 22nd at 5:00 pm -- Katharine Kerr, signing for SWORD OF FIRE

Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books [Sponsors and Guests only]

Saturday, February 29th at 6:00 pm -- Seanan McGuire, signing for COME TUMBLING DOWN and IMAGINARY NUMBERS

Friday, March 6th -8th - FOGcon in Walnut Creek

Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsors' General Meeting [Sponsors and Guests only]

The Titan Beetle Version:

Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  -- Astronomy Lecture featuring Catherine Espaillat at Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences (55 Music Concourse Dr, San Francisco). $15.00.  If you've not had a chance to hear a lecture at the Academy of Sciences, you are in for a treat.  This lecture in particular caught our eye and we hope you can join us.  From the website: "We know that planets are born in the protoplanetary disks that surround stars when they are young.  How these disks evolve into planetary systems is a fundamental question in Astronomy.  Observations have revealed remarkable structures in disks that may indicate the presence of newly born planets.  This talk will review these key observations and compare them to current theoretical predictions of planet formation.  To conclude,  possibilities for future progress in the field will be discussed."  Tickets are $15.00 for non-museum members, $12.00 for members and seniors.  As usual, if you'll let us know you're going, well keep an eye out for you - just reply to this email to RSVP.  For tickets: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/baby-planets-and-their-nurseries

Sunday, January 12th at 6:30 pm -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina St. San Francisco) with authors Cecelia Holland and Kim Stanley Robinson - (Suggested donation $10, no one turned away for lack of funds.)  Doors at 6:00 pm, event begins at 6:30 pm.  We're so happy to participate in the Science Fiction in San Francisco reading series! The authors will read a selection from their work, followed by Q&A from the audience moderated by author Terry Bisson.  The authors will schmooze & sign books after.  Books available for sale courtesy of Borderlands Books.  Seating is limited, so first come, first seated.  Bar proceeds benefit the American Bookbinders Museum.  Questions? Email sfinsfevents@gmail.com.

Saturday, February 8th at 3:00 pm -- Juliet Wade, MAZES OF POWER - We're delighted to welcome local author Juliette Wade, showing off her debut novel MAZES OF POWER! From the book description: "The cavern city of Pelismara has stood for a thousand years. The Great Families of the nobility cling to the myths of their golden age while the city's technology wanes.  When a fever strikes, and the Eminence dies, seventeen-year-old Tagaret is pushed to represent his Family in the competition for Heir to the Throne. To win would give him the power to rescue his mother from his abusive father, and marry the girl he loves. But the struggle for power distorts everything in this highly stratified society, and the fever is still loose among the inbred, susceptible nobles. Tagaret's sociopathic younger brother, Nekantor, is obsessed with their family's success. Nekantor is willing to exploit Tagaret, his mother, and her new servant Aloran to defeat their opponents.  Can he be stopped? Should he be stopped? And will they recognize themselves after the struggle has changed them?"  Join us to meet this up-and-coming author who is soon to be a superstar! Juliette will be in conversation with author Deborah J. Ross.

Saturday, February 8th at 7:30 pm -- Writers With Drinks (at The Make Out Room, 3225 22nd Street, San Francisco) with authors Tracy Clark Flory, Barbara Tomash,  Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu - Writers With Drinks is the most awesome spoken-word variety show in the world, hosted by the incredible Charlie Jane Anders, and we're always happy to participate!  The amazing lineup this month includes Tracy Clark Flory, Barbara Tomash, Juliette Wade, and Charles Yu! Cost: $5 to $20, no-one turned away for lack of funds.  All proceeds benefit local non-profits.  Doors open at 7:00 and Borderlands will be on hand to sell books. http://www.writerswithdrinks.com/

Tuesday, February 11th at 6:00 pm -- Sarah Gailey, UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED - We couldn't be more excited to welcome Sarah Gailey, who will be showing off their brand-new novella UPRIGHT WOMEN WANTED!  Jude can't stop raving about this book and we're convinced you'll love it, too.  Here's the description from the publisher: "Esther is a stowaway. She's hidden herself away in the Librarian's book wagon in an attempt to escape the marriage her father has arranged for her -- a marriage to the man who was previously engaged to her best friend.  Her best friend who she was in love with.  Her best friend who was just executed for possession of resistance propaganda.  The future American Southwest is full of bandits, fascists, and queer librarian spies on horseback trying to do the right thing."  Join us to meet Sarah and hear all about your next favorite book!

Saturday, February 22nd at 5:00 pm -- Katharine Kerr, SWORD OF FIRE - We're always happy to welcome the beloved Katharine Kerr to Borderlands! She's back with the first a new trilogy that will re-introduce readers to Deverry!  From the book description: "The bards are the people’s voice -- and their sword.  All over the kingdom of Deverry, the common people are demanding reform of the corrupt law courts.  In Aberwyn, the situation catches fire when Gwerbret Ladoic, second in authority only to the High King, allows a bard to starve to death rather than hear their grievances.  Guildwoman Alyssa, a student at the local scholars' collegium, and Lady Dovina, the gwerbret's own daughter, know that evidence exists to overthrow the so-called traditional legal system, if they can only get it into the right hands. The powerful lords will kill anyone who threatens their privileges.  To retrieve the proof, Alyssa must make a dangerous journey that will either change her life forever -- or end it."  Don't miss this near-legendary author who is at the height of her creative powers right now!

Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm --  Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books.  [Sponsors and Guests only] Join us for food, drink, and merriment as we talk about books, buy books, and maybe even win some free books in the raffle!  This is our first sponsor social of the year, and we hope you'll come by to meet fellow sponsors and toast the absolutely incredible fact that YOU made it possible for the store to survive.  Bring your favorite treat or drink to share, be super-social, or simply find a book and a quiet corner to commune -- we're just delighted to have you.

Saturday, February 29th at 6:00 pm -- Seanan McGuire, COME TUMBLING DOWN and IMAGINARY NUMBERS  - Details to come!

Friday, March 6-8 -- FOGcon in Walnut Creek.  Once again we will be setting up shop at the Walnut Creek Marriott for the 10th (!) FOGcon.  This year's featured guests include Mary Anne Mohanraj and Nisi Shawl.  Find more details and register here: https://fogcon.org/

Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm — Sponsor General Meeting [Sponsors only].  Join us for a recap of the prior year and our goals for the upcoming year, including the status of our move to Haight Street.

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Sponsor Letter, December 5th 2019

Hi Everyone,

Due to a few things coming up and the time it took me to write the piece for the main store newsletter, this note is going to be short.  But, at the end of this email you'll find a story that might entertain.  It's something I wrote back in 2007 for a series we were doing for the store's ten-year anniversary.  It's particularly appropriate now since I'm starting the pre-planning for the design and construction of the new shelves for Haight St.

Speaking of Haight St, we passed the last inspection for the new electrical service (that's the one for the new panels we put in the apartments upstairs) so that permit is finally closed.  It was the first one we pulled and so having it done is a nice little mile-stone for the end of the year.  Other than that, it's just been little bits of work since I last wrote.  But, I have high hopes for this month, despite the holidays.

One last thing -- if you're planning on joining us at the Dickens Christmas Fair this Sunday, I'm sad to say that I won't be there.  Given all the work at Haight St. I missed last month, I decided to work there this Sunday, December 8th.  But Jude will be there (along with Jeremy, who will be sporting a fancy new hat).  They'll be hanging around the tables near the Green Man Inn from noon until 4:00 pm, if you want to find them.  It would also be great if you'd let us know if you're coming -- just reply to this email if you are.

You have my sincere best wishes for a calm and happy holiday followed by a lovely New Year.

All Best,
Alan

PS: If you'd like to pre-order a 2020 Borderlands Sponsorship online, starting on the 15th you can at https://borderlands-books.com/buysponsorship.html  Once that goes live, I'll be sending out a quick reminder note to you all.

The postcard version:

(1) Sunday, December 8th at noon -- Dickens Christmas Fair, Cow Palace, Daly City

(2) <private>

(3) Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  --  Astronomy lecture, Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park

(4) Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books

(5) Friday, March 6-8 - FOGCon in Walnut Creek

(6) Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm -- Sponsors' General Meeting

The care-package version:

(1) Sunday, December 8th at noon -- Dickens Christmas Fair, Cow Palace, Daly City.  It's quickly becoming a tradition for us at Borderlands Books, and we couldn't resist another trip back in time at the Dickens Christmas Fair.  Feel free to join up with us anytime after noon-- we'll be the ones holding the tankard of ale in honor of Queen Victoria's 200th Birthday.  Look for us at the tables near the Green Man Inn on Bell Ringers Alley.  Tickets can be purchased directly through their website at https://dickensfair.com/.

(2)  <private>

(3) Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  -- Astronomy lecture featuring Catherine Espaillat at Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences (55 Music Concourse Dr, San Francisco). $15.00.  If you've not had a chance to hear a lecture at the Academy of Sciences, you are in for a treat.  This lecture in particular caught our eye and we hope you can join us.  From the website: "We know that planets are born in the protoplanetary disks that surround stars when they are young.  How these disks evolve into planetary systems is a fundamental question in Astronomy.  Observations have revealed remarkable structures in disks that may indicate the presence of newly born planets.  This talk will review these key observations and compare them to current theoretical predictions of planet formation.  To conclude,  possibilities for future progress in the field will be discussed."  Tickets are $15.00 for non-museum members, $12.00 for members and seniors.  As usual, if you'll let us know you're going, well keep an eye out for you - just reply to this email to RSVP.  For tickets: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/baby-planets-and-their-nurseries

(4) Saturday, February 22 at 7:00 pm --  Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books.  [Sponsors and Guests only] Join us for food, drink, and merriment as we talk about books, buy books, and maybe even win some free books in the raffle!  This is our first sponsor social of the year, and we hope you'll come by to meet fellow sponsors and toast the absolutely incredible fact that YOU made it possible for the store to survive.  Bring your favorite treat or drink to share, be super-social, or simply find a book and a quiet corner to commune -- we're just delighted to have you.

(5) Friday, March 6-8 -- FOGCon in Walnut Creek.  Once again we will be setting up shop at the Walnut Creek Marriott for the 10th (!) FOGCon.  This year's featured guests include Mary Anne Mohanraj and Nisi Shawl.

(6) Tuesday, March 31 at 7:00 pm — Sponsor General Meeting [Sponsors only].  Join us for a recap of the prior year and our goals for the upcoming year including the status for moving to Haight Street.


The Tale of Minwax Golden Oak and Diamond Finish

Many years ago when dinosaurs roamed the earth, Alan Beatts decided to open a book store.  The Alan Beatts then was not like the Alan Beatts you see now.  He was younger.  He had darker hair, more energy, and a deep-seated aversion to sleeves.  He also didn't know much at all about woodworking.

But he needed shelves if he was going to have a bookstore.  Lots of shelves.

In the course of a month, he managed to get shelves.  About twenty-five of them.  All tall and all unfinished.  And that's where the problem began.

Anyone who has refinished a coffee table knows how it goes.  You sand, then you might put on some kind of stain, and then you add a few coats of some sort of sealer. Wait for it to dry and you're done.  It's a nice little bit of handyman work that'll take up a few hours some weekend.  But, a good sized coffee table has perhaps 3 or 4 square feet of surface.  Twenty-five tall bookshelves have a bit more surface.

A lot more surface, actually.  Like ten times more surface.  Per shelf.  Times twenty-five shelves.

Alan did a little math and realized he was in hell.

So he went looking for some expert advice.  Looking through the phone book (remember, back then the internet wasn't quite as useful as it is now), he found a company in town that advertised, "Everything for professional wood finishing".  When he chatted with the owner (who didn't seem very friendly or terribly helpful but he was a professional -- the sign outside said so) and explained the situation, the solution was clear: "gel stain and wax," said the professional.  A large check was written, warnings about "no returns" were stated, and less than an hour later the finishing began.  And then stopped almost immediately.

Gel stain is great stuff.  It doesn't splash, dries quickly, and goes on evenly.  But (and this is a big but), it's a goo.  It has to be rubbed on.  And it's a really big pain to get into inside corners (of which a tall bookshelf has 34).  Call professional.

"It's really hard to get the stain into the corners."

"Yeah."

"What do I do?"

"Try using a Q-Tip."

" . . . . "

"So long."

Much brooding ensued.  "There is no way that I'm going to finish twenty-five blankity-blank bookshelves with a blanking Q-Tip," thought Alan to himself.  By way of distraction while thinking about the problem, he read the instructions for the wax which was meant to follow the stain -

"Rub on"

"Buff vigorously when dry"

"Re-coat every six months to a year . . . RE-COAT every SIX MONTHS to a YEAR!!!!"

"@&%##&@!  &%$#@& professional!  I'll $@#&%$&* him in front of his family and then &&%@#^&^!"

More brooding.  And then Alan called his bank.  Then he called the professional and told him that the stain and wax would be returned tomorrow.

"We don't take returns.  I told you that."

"I know.  You're going to this time.  I stopped the check.  Don't bother trying to deposit it."

" . . . . "

"So long."

The next day, materials returned, Alan went looking for another solution.  He remembered one of the people who he had talked with when he was first looking for shelves.  This guy had run a bookstore until he realized that selling bookshelves was more profitable (what this means about the book business is an exercise best left to the reader).  A quick phone call revealed that there was a product that went on quickly and dried very fast.  And, as a matter of fact, the bookshelf guy had a bunch on hand that he'd be happy to sell for a reasonable price.  He gotten it for a big project but later decided that lacquer wasn't the right finish to use.  Arrangements were made to pick up several gallons the next day.

That evening while chatting over a beer with friends, the story of the wood finishing was told.  When the new finish, this "lacquer" stuff was mentioned, one of the people around the table, a motorcyclist named Johnny, blanched and asked if Alan had ever used this stuff.

"No, but it seems pretty simple.  And the best part is how fast it dries."

"Yeah, that's one of the reasons they sometimes call it 'flash'.  I don't think you should use that stuff."

"Why?"

"It's too dangerous.  You'll blow yourself up."

"WHAT!?"

"That stuff is really, really, flammable.  Pretty much one spark when you've been working with it for a while and the fumes'll send you to Jesus.  In pieces.  That's the other reason they call it 'flash'.  I'm surprised you could find any.  The state is trying to ban it."

"Oh."

Risk is sometimes a subjective thing.  One person's "too dangerous" isn't always the same as someone else's.  But, Johnny had an interesting relationship with the concept of "dangerous". For example he is perhaps the only person on the planet to have accidentally cut a Nissan pickup truck in half.  With a motorcycle.  It seems that at 80 miles per hour a Suzuki GS1100 is capable of actually severing the frame of a light pickup truck when it impacts at 90 degrees right behind the cab.  Johnny commented later that it didn't seem too dangerous to be going that fast.  After all it was a side road and there wasn't any traffic.

The next day Alan just didn't bother to show up to get the lacquer.

Time for plan C.  Discount Builders' Supply is an example of a vanishing breed.  It's a huge independent hardware store right near highway 101 in the middle of San Francisco.  That's hard enough to find these days but even more unusual, 'Da Builders (as we call it) pays a good wage and has an older staff who pretty much know everything about their specialty.  There is no telling how many people they have educated over the years, but that day Alan became one of them.

The lady in the paint department listened to the whole story, asked a few questions and said, "Try a Minwax stain.  You can brush it on and it dries overnight.  Then use a water-based sealer. They dry in about six hours and there aren't any fumes to worry about.  You'll have to use a few coats but that's the best way to go."

And that's how it worked.  It took just over a week of working 12 to 14 hours a day but at the end all the shelves were done.  With encouragement from Nick Cave, Leonard Cohen and Tom Waits it wasn't even hell.  A long job, sure, but not hell.

The shelves looked really good.

And they still do.  The original shelves are still in use nine years later.  After a move and several different layouts, they make up the large rolling shelves in the middle of the store.  And they've never been refinished.

*****

PS  Today, in 2019, those shelves are still in the shop.  They look a tiny bit more worn now but still looking good.  And they've yet to be refinished.

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Sponsor Letter, November 19th 2019

Hi You All,

Please forgive a very, very short note this month but I've been quite busy with some family matters and I am.  So.  Behind.  On.  Everything.  But, I'll have a nice year-end piece for you next month and I'll hope to see you around the shop sometime soon.

All Best,
Alan

The winter solstice version:

(1) TOMORROW! Wednesday, November 20th at 6:00 pm -- A Fundraiser for Reading Partners!, Borderlands Books

(2) Sunday, November 24th at 3:00 pm -- Reading and signing for NINJA DAUGHTER by Tori Eldridge

(3) Sunday, December 8th at noon -- Dickens Christmas Fair, Cow Palace, Daly City.

(4) Omitted

(5) Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  --  Astronomy lecture, Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park

The summer solstice version:

(1) TOMORROW! Wednesday, November 20th at 6:00 pm  -- A Fundraiser for Reading Partners! Join Reading Parters for Books & Brews: Thanksgiving Edition at Borderlands Books!  Get in the spirit of the giving season while enjoying light bites and drinks full of fall flavors and connecting with your local community. All ticket sales go directly to Reading Partners' impactful literacy programs that serve over 1500 students in the Bay Area.  Tickets are $10; see the link below. This event is hosted by Reading Partners Young Professionals, a community of emerging leaders who are paving the way for a brighter future for students across the Bay Area.  https://donations.readingpartners.org/event/books-and-brews-thanksgiving-edition/e255020

(2) Sunday, November 24th at 3:00 pm  -- Reading and signing for NINJA DAUGHTER by Tori Eldridge. We're happy to welcome author Tori Eldridge to Borderlands for her debut novel!  "THE NINJA DAUGHTER is an action-packed thriller about a Chinese-Norwegian modern-day ninja with Joy Luck Club family issues who fights the Los Angeles Ukrainian mob, sex traffickers, and her own family to save two desperate women and an innocent child."  Tori's own history is fascinating. . . from her bio, she is "a Honolulu-born thriller writer who challenges perspective and empowers the spirit. She holds a fifth-degree black belt in To-Shin Do Ninjutsu and has traveled the USA teaching seminars on the ninja arts, weapons, and women’s self-protection."  We hope you'll join us to meet Tori and check out this new thriller!

(3) Sunday, December 8th at noon -- Dickens Christmas Fair, Cow Palace, Daly City.  It's quickly becoming a tradition for us at Borderlands Books, and we couldn't resist another trip back in time at the Dickens Christmas Fair.  Feel free to join up with us anytime after noon-- we'll be the ones holding the tankard of ale in honor of Queen Victoria's 200th Birthday.  Tickets can be purchased directly through their website at https://dickensfair.com/.

(4) Omitted

(5) Monday, January 13th at 7:30 pm  -- Astronomy lecture featuring Catherine Espaillat at Morrison Planetarium, California Academy of Sciences.  $15.00.  If you've not had a chance to explore the Academy of Sciences, you are in for a treat.  This lecture in particular caught our eye and we hope you can join us.  From the website: "We know that planets are born in the protoplanetary disks that surround stars when they are young.  How these disks evolve into planetary systems is a fundamental question in Astronomy. Observations have revealed remarkable structures in disks that may indicate the presence of newly born planets.  This talk will review these key observations and compare them to current theoretical predictions of planet formation. To conclude,  possibilities for future progress in the field will be discussed."  Tickets are $15.00 for non-museum members, $12.00 for members and seniors. For tickets: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/baby-planets-and-their-nurseries

Thursday, October 10, 2019

Sponsor Letter, October 8th 2019

Hi Lovely Sponsors

As you can see from this note, I managed to survive the last few weeks.  It was quite a thing though.  Catch me at the next social or at the Haight St. Open house on the 20th and I'll be happy to tell you a few stories.  But, all is good in Alan-land (and Border-land).  I also had time to write a little thing this month.  You'll find it right after this and before the upcoming events list.  Let me know what you think?

All Best,
Alan

A Coda

I read something last week that tied in quite nicely to what I wrote about last month.  Without any further introduction, here it is;

"San Francisco has been for most of its 150-year existence both a refuge and an anomaly.  Soon it will be neither.  Gentrification is transforming the city by driving out the poor and working class, including those who have chosen to give their lives to unlucrative pursuits such as art, activism, social experimentation, social service.  But gentrification is just the fin above the water.  Below is the rest of the shark: a new American economy in which most of us will be poorer, and few will be far richer, and everything will be faster, more homogenous and more controlled or controllable.  The technology boom and the accompanying housing crisis have fast-forwarded San Francisco into the newest version of the American future, a version that also is being realized in Boston, Seattle, and other cities from New York and Atlanta to Denver and Portland."

"A decade ago Los Angeles looked like the future -- urban decay, open warfare, segregation, despair, injustice and corruption -- but the new future looks like San Francisco: a frenzy of financial speculation, covert coercions, overt erasures, a barrage of novelty-item restaurants, websites, technologies and trends, the despair of unemployment replaced by the numbness of incessant work hours and the anxiety of destabilized jobs, homes and neighborhoods.  Thirty-five percent of the venture capital in this country is in the Bay Area, along with 30 percent of the multimedia/Internet businesses, and the boom that started in Silicon Valley has produced a ripple effect throughout the region from south of San Jose to Napa and Sonoma in the north."

"San Francisco has had the most expensive housing of any major American city in the nation for two decades, but in the past few years housing prices -- both sale and rents -- have been skyrocketing, along with commercial rents.  New businesses are coming in at a hectic pace, and they in turn generate new boutiques, restaurants and bars that displace earlier businesses, particularly nonprofits, and the new industry's workers have been outbidding for rentals and buying houses out from under tenants at a breakneck pace.  Regionally, home sales and rental prices have gone up by 30 percent over the past three years, but the rates of increase is far more dramatic in San Francisco."

If you read carefully you noticed that, despite being an accurate description of right-here and right-now, there were a few things that seemed a little bit . . . off.  Phrases like, "the multimedia/Internet businesses" with its oddly capitalized "I", or perhaps the inaccurate, "rental prices have gone up by 30 percent over the past three years".

That's because it was written at the end of the last century.  It's from the opening chapter of Hollow City, by Rebecca Solnit and Susan Schwartzinberg (Verso, 2000).

Although I lived in San Francisco through the period that they're writing about, I had forgotten just how exactly the state of San Francisco then matched our current one.  At least I had forgotten until I read that passage.  History does indeed repeat itself.

After reading that, I had two thoughts.  My first was that, at the time, my sense of disruption was much less than what I've been feeling these last few years.  That might be because I was younger and also less engaged with the overall fabric of the city.  Running a bookstore for 20 years does tend to hook you into your community.  But, it also could be because what's happening this time around is, in fact, more profound.  In 1998-1999 the real center of the action was on the mid-peninsula, whereas this time, it's right in the middle of the city.

My other thought was, "How could the people who are (notionally) in charge of the city not see the risk in where we were headed?" Mayor Ed Lee, who not only presided over the beginning of the current boom but arguably was one of its architects, was working in city government in 1999.  In fact, he was the Executive Director of the San Francisco Human Rights Commission -- which is tasked with working to, "increase equality, eradicate discrimination, and to protect human rights for all people".  Wouldn't you think he would have remembered 1999 and taken some of those lessons into account before offering tax breaks that were _meant_ to create a tech boom all over again?

Or, what about our current Mayor (and former President of the Board of Supervisors from 2015-2017), London Breed?  In 1999 she was an intern at the Office of Housing and Neighborhood Services.  I'm betting she had some first-hand experience with the effects of the dot-com boom on housing and displacement.  But, does it seem like she remembered those lessons?  I'd say; Nope.

If I wanted to keep digging, I'm sure that the list would go on and on.  In short, a bunch of people involved in running the city experienced _exactly_ what is happening right now but were either too dumb, too greedy, or too careless to take it into consideration this time around. And so here we are . . . .  I gotta say, it sorta pisses me off because it probably was avoidable.

Fundamentally I think that the obligation of a city's government is to look out for the best interests of the people who live there.  In that, I think that the government of San Francisco has failed us over the past eight years.  The whole story is a long one and it started around 2011, in the aftermath of the great recession, but the short version is that the Mayor and the rest of the city government made a concerted (and expensive) effort to encourage tech companies to locate in San Francisco, rather than down the peninsula in "Silicon Valley".  (If you'd like to read more about that whole story, this article is quite good - https://time.com/14335/twitter-tax-break-san-francisco/)  In doing so, they forgot or ignored the lessons of 1999.  As a result, San Francisco became a place that was very attractive to people who didn't already live here. And it worked -- far too well for the good of the people and businesses who were already here.

If the lessons of 1999 had been kept in mind, steps could have been taken to ameliorate the negative effects of drawing huge numbers of affluent professionals to SF.  But, so far as I have been able to find, there was not only no effort made, there was no thought given to it.  I don't think that it was malicious.  I think it was simply stupid and short-sighted. But, it was also essentially predictable.  In a large part because, despite its current stature, the government of San Francisco doesn't (and never has) understood how to operate like a real big city.  It still operates in the half-assed, vaguely-but-incompetently-corrupt, gee-we're-doing-the-best-we-can style of a mid-sized, Mid-Western city like Tulsa, Oklahoma, or Birmingham, Alabama.

Speaking from experience, when SF actually _was_ just a mid-sized city with nothing much major going on, not only did that system work fine -- it was kind of charming.  But, thanks to Mayor Lee and the Board of Supervisors, we are far, far past those days.  Sadly, San Francisco may have grown up and become a "big city" with real problems.  But, more sadly, it seems that the city government is stuck somewhere around high-school and isn't showing any signs of graduating soon.

The diminutive version:

(1) Wednesday, October 16th at 7:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- THE LADY FROM THE BLACK LAGOON by Mallory O'Meara (part of Litquake's lineup at Alamo Drafthouse).

(2) Saturday, October 19th at 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) Litquake LitCrawl Phase 2: Women Imagine Different Worlds and 8:00 pm (PUBLIC) Litquake LitCrawl Phase 3: Adventures in Crime and Time

(3) Sunday, October 20th from noon - 4:00 pm -- Borderlands Haight Street open house

(4) Thursday, October 24th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for THE BURNING WHITE by Brent Weeks

(5) Saturday, October 26th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for THE SECRET OF LIFE by Rudy Rucker

(6) Saturday, November 9th from 7:00 to 11:00 pm -- Fall Sponsor Social.

(7) Saturday, November 16th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- An Evening with Seanan McGuire

(8) Sunday, November 24th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for NINJA DAUGHTER by Tori Eldridge

(9) Dickens Christmas Fair -- details to follow

The multitudinous version:

(1) Wednesday, October 16th at 7:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Screening of "Creature From the Black Lagoon" and conversation and signing with Mallory O'Meera, author of THE LADY FROM THE BLACK LAGOON (part of Litquake's lineup at Alamo Drafthouse, 2550 Mission Mission Street, San Francisco).  The horror film "Creature from the Black Lagoon" released to theaters in 1954, and quickly became iconic.  But thanks to a jealous male colleague, the monster's designer Milicent Patrick received zero credit for her contribution.  Her career ended soon thereafter, and she disappeared.  Screenwriter and film producer Mallory O'Meara uncovers a fascinating story of the woman who created one of Hollywood's classic movie monsters.  THE LADY FROM THE BLACK LAGOON establishes Milicent Patrick in her rightful place in film history, while calling out a Hollywood culture where little has changed since.  Book signing at 6:00 pm, followed by 7:00 pm onstage conversation and screening of the film (in 3-D).  We especially wanted to call your attention to this super-cool event and screening!  Jude will be on hand to sell books, and if you feel like hanging out, we can grab a drink at the Bull and Bear afterwards.  Tickets $25, https://drafthouse.com/show/litquake-presents-the-lady-from-the-black-lagoon-w-mallory-omeara

(2) Saturday, October 19th at 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) Litquake LitCrawl Phase 2: Women Imagine Different Worlds with authors Lisa Goldstein, M. Luke McDonell, Pat Murphy, Madeleine Robins, and Maggie Tokuda-Hall - For over a decade SF in SF has offered readings, films, and special events in the Bay Area for readers of science fiction, fantasy, and speculative fiction. This event features women authors from the event series.
8:00 pm (PUBLIC) Litquake LitCrawl Phase 3: Adventures in Crime and Time with authors Mark Coggins, Paul Drexler, Richard Kadrey, and Annalee Newitz.  We're happy to host four fantastic authors whose work will range from noir science fiction to true & fictional crime to time-travel escapades!

(3) Sunday, October 20th from noon - 4:00 pm -- Borderlands Haight Street Construction Project Open House at our location-to-be, 1377 Haight St. at Masonic St. -- See the legendary Beam of Eye!  Enjoy the crazy stories of the stuff we found when we took over the place!  Anticipate just how beautiful it's going to be!  Marvel at the sheer amount of dust!  We do hope you'll drop by to check out the bookstore's future Forever Home and see the work in progress.  Alan will be on hand to show you around and answer questions.

(4) Thursday, October 24th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for THE BURNING WHITE by Brent Weeks. We're are always excited to welcome the delightful Brent Weeks back to Borderlands, and particularly this time -- for the long-awaited fifth and final volume of the Lightbringer sequence, THE BURNING WHITE! We hope you'll join us to meet Brent and celebrate the last installment of this epic series!

(5) Saturday, October 26th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- It's always a treat to welcome the quirky and irrepressible genius Rudy Rucker to the store!  Rudy is an author, artist, mathematician and one of the godfathers of Cyberpunk.  Join us to check out the release of his new novels THE SECRET OF LIFE and MILLION MILE ROAD TRIP, and celebrate the reprints of a few other titles! Here's the summary of SECRET from the author's website, and we urge you to check it out! "A 60s college student learns he's a saucer alien.  As if he hadn't suspected it all along.  As Conrad Bunger faces his true nature, he takes on a series of awesome powers. He can change his face, shrink to the size of a thumb, fly around the Eiffel tower -- and hand out joints to everyone at his college's annual student assembly.  And this is important because government snipers are out to kill him.  Why did youth rebel in the 60s? This transreal book will help you understand how it happened, and what the underlying feelings were."

(6) Saturday, November 9th 7:00 to 11:00 pm -- Fall Sponsor Social.  Join us for food, drink, and merriment as we talk about books, buy books, and maybe even win some oddities in the raffle! Lots of great food and great conversation with great people.  Doesn't that sound great? C'mon down for the last Sponsor Social of 2019; bring your favorite treat or drink to share, be super-social, or simply find a book and a quiet corner to commune -- we're just delighted to have you.

(7) Saturday, November 16th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- An Evening with Seanan McGuire.  We're always thrilled to welcome formerly-local author Seanan McGuire to Borderlands! The astonishingly prolific Seanan has FOUR recent books out -- IN THE SHADOW OF SPINDRIFT HOUSE (as Mira Grant); THE UNKINDEST TIDE (the newest October Daye book); the fancy tenth anniversary (!) hardcover edition of ROSEMARY AND RUE; and the incredible new short story collection LAUGHTER AT THE ACADEMY.  Join us to meet Seanan, have books signed, and be regaled with tales funny, strange, and distressing.  Feel free to bring baked goods to share if you like!

(8) Sunday, November 24th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for NINJA DAUGHTER by Tori Eldridge. We're happy to welcome author Tori Eldridge to Borderlands for her debut novel!  "THE NINJA DAUGHTER is an action-packed thriller about a Chinese-Norwegian modern-day ninja with Joy Luck Club family issues who fights the Los Angeles Ukrainian mob, sex traffickers, and her own family to save two desperate women and an innocent child."  Tori's own history is fascinating. . . from her bio, she is "a Honolulu-born thriller writer who challenges perspective and empowers the spirit. She holds a fifth-degree black belt in To-Shin Do Ninjutsu and has traveled the USA teaching seminars on the ninja arts, weapons, and women’s self-protection."  We hope you'll join us to meet Tori and check out this new thriller!

(9) Dickens Christmas Fair -- details to follow

Sponsor Letter, September 10th 2019

Hi Dear Sponsors,

It's been a busy couple of months.  In case you were wondering, you didn't miss last month's sponsor note -- there wasn't one.  I kept hoping that I'd have time to write a followup to the article about local businesses that I wrote back in July but the chance kept slipping past me.  And then I looked up and it was the 24th of August, so I figured that it didn't make sense to send a note for August.  So I planned to send one out right at the beginning of September.  You see how that worked out.

On the bright side, the hectic pace isn't the result of a problem, per se.  I've had a lot of work to do at the new building and so it's been a bit all-consuming.  Not to mention tiring.  I'm pleased to say that I can still do just about as much construction work in a day as I could when I was 40.  It's just that I'm much (much!) more sore and tired at the end of it.  That makes it hard to write something clever (or write something at all, really) at the end of the day.

It's looking like this month is going to be more of the same, which is why I realized this morning that I'd better go into work later so I can get this and the following article written _before_ I've spent a day framing walls.

Speaking of framing walls, what's making this month extra-plus busy is that the city is going to be replacing the sidewalk all along our block on Haight St.  Based on the work they've done, it's going to look great and the existing paving surely needs to be replaced.

The catch for me is that the front of the store there doesn't exist yet.  We tore out the old, crummy one months ago to put up temporary framing and plywood.  You may have seen the punchline to this story coming by now -- the temporary covering is resting on the sidewalk that is going to be replaced.  Granted, we could remove it all, build a new, temporary wall at the property line, and then put it all back once the sidewalk was done.  But, all together, that's several days of work that I'd rather not waste.  The other option is to get the framing for the new storefront in place before the sidewalk work.  Once the framing is there, we can cover it with plywood and do the finishing work at our leisure.

When the city sent the notice and schedule for the work on the sidewalk, it was supposed to happen in front of our shop in five weeks.  "Oh my," I thought, "I guess we'll have to jump right on that after the asbestos guys have removed the floor."

Then I talked with the job foreman yesterday.  It seems that the local merchants have put pressure on the city to get the work done faster.  So they're going to be at our shop by the END OF NEXT WEEK.

"Oh hell," I thought, "I guess that I know what I'm doing every waking moment between now and the 17th."

Bottom line is this -- the followup to my July article is going to be shorter and less comprehensive than I planned.  It's a damn shame because I got some great comments back from my first piece that improved my understanding, both of the problem and the breadth of it. (Side note - Thank you Bruno, Trudy, Lisa, Jayson, Lydia, Eloise, and Donald.  I didn't have time to reply to all of you but I really appreciated your comments.)  But I figure it's better to write something short than to have a plan for something long that never gets written.  I hope to come back to the topic sometime.

The other bottom line is . . . I'm not getting a whole lot of rest for the next week.  Seriously though, this isn't going to be impossible to get done.  I've got a clear idea what I'm building and it's not even close to as tricky as the bathroom.  It shouldn't be too hard -- just long and tiring.

Good thing I can still work like a 40 year-old, eh?  And also I good thing that I have _a lot_ of ibuprofen.

All Best,
Alan

PS  Like last time, I'm going to put the article at the end of this note.

PPS  Despite the construction work, I will be at the social this Saturday.  I hope to see you there.

Upcoming Events

The Ebenezer Place version:

(1) Thursday, September 12th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Informal signing with D.J. Butler (WITCHY KINGDOM) Christopher Husberg (FEAR THE STARS) and Christopher Ruocchio (THE HOWLING DARK)

(2) Saturday, September 14th 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- In conversation with Fonda Lee (JADE WAR) and Megan O'Keefe (VELOCITY WEAPON)

(3) Saturday, September 14th, 7:00 pm -- Fall Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books

(4) Sunday, September 15th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading, signing and Q&A with Chad Stroup, author of SEXY LEPER

(5) September 15th at 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina, San Francisco) with authors Christopher Brown and Hannu Rajaniemi

(6) Sunday, September 22nd, 12:00 noon -- Picnic and BBQ at Table #15 in Lindley Meadow, Golden Gate Park

(7) Saturday. September 28th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for SHATTER WAR by Dana Fredsti and Dave Fitzgerald

(8) Sunday, September 29th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing for THE FUTURE OF ANOTHER TIMELINE by Annalee Newitz

(9) Wednesday, October 2nd, 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina, San Francisco) with authors Garth Nix and E. Lily Yu

(10) Saturday, October 5th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) --  Reading and signing for TURNING DARKNESS INTO LIGHT by Marie Brennan

The Yonge Street version:

(1) Thursday, September 12th at 6:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Informal signing with D.J. Butler (WITCHY KINGDOM, Baen, Hardcover, $25.00) Christopher Husberg (FEAR THE STARS, Titan Books, Trade Paperback, $14.95) and Christopher Ruocchio (THE HOWLING DARK, DAW, Hardcover, $27.00) - Join us for a meet-and-greet signing with three fantastic up and coming authors!

(2) Saturday, September 14th 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- In conversation with Fonda Lee.  We're happy to welcome World Fantasy Award winner Fonda Lee to Borderlands! Ms. Lee will be presenting JADE WAR, the second novel in the Green Bone Series. (The first book in the series, JADE CITY, won that World Fantasy Award, and "was nominated for the Nebula Award and the Locus Award, and was named a Best Book of 2017 by NPR, Syfy Wire, and others".) Ms. Lee will be in conversation with fabulous local author Megan E. O'Keefe.  We hope you'll join us to meet both authors and explore this epic and magical fantasy series!

(3) Saturday, September 14th, 7:00 pm -- Fall Sponsor Social at Borderlands Books.  Join us for food, drink, and merriment as we talk about books, buy books, and maybe even win some free books in the raffle!  Our Fall sponsor social is usually the busiest one of the year, and we hope you'll come by to meet fellow sponsors and toast the absolutely incredible fact that YOU made it possible for the store to survive.  Bring your favorite treat or drink to share, be super-social, or simply find a book and a quiet corner to commune -- we're just delighted to have you.

(4) Sunday, September 15th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading, signing and Q&A with Chad Stroup, author of SEXY LEPER. From the book description, "It's Halloween in the Hollywood Hills, and Kat Dyer's going to have the sexiest costume for a night of shameless debauchery. However, Kat's plan is derailed when the costume shop screws up her order and gives her a costume that is the polar-opposite of sexy. Deciding it's better to be temporarily ugly and seen than beautiful and quickly forgotten, Kat attends the biggest party of the year, only to awaken with the strangest post-Halloween hangover ever: partygoers are transforming into the likenesses of the costumes they wore the night before. Meanwhile, a mysterious force begins to stalk and pick them off on by one. Kat and her friends must discover the cause of the horror, and what they find will haunt them forever."

(5) Sunday, September 15th at 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina, San Francisco) with authors Christopher Brown and Hannu Rajaniemi - (Suggested donation $10.)  Doors and bar at 6:00 pm, event begins at 6:30 pm.  We're so happy to participate in the Science Fiction in San Francisco reading series!  This month we're joined by fabulous authors Christopher Brown and Hannu Rajaniemi.  The authors will read a selection from their work, followed by Q&A from the audience moderated by Terry Bisson. Authors will schmooze & sign books after.  Books will be available for sale.  Seating is limited, so first come, first seated.  Bar proceeds benefit the American Bookbinders Museum. Questions? Email sfinsfevents@gmail.com.

(6) Sunday, September 22nd, 12:00 noon (PUBLIC) -- Picnic and BBQ at Table 15 in Lindley Meadow, Golden Gate Park.  Located near the western-most end of Lindley Meadow, join the crew of Borderlands as we soak up the (hopefully) warm San Francisco Fall sunshine and grill our favorite picnic treats.  We're actually leaving the store and venturing into the outside world for a potluck cookout in Golden Gate Park!  And, since it's September, it'll be the height of San Francisco summertime. We've reserved table #15 (as close to the bathrooms as we could get!) at Lindley Meadow.  Directions are at the link below, but the TL;DR version is that Lindley Meadow is on the south side of JFK Drive, across from the 30th Avenue and Fulton Street entrance in Golden Gate Park. (At 30th Avenue and JFK, there is a sign for Lindley Meadow.) http://sfrecpark.org/destination/golden-gate-park/ggp-lindley-meadow-picnic-area/ Bring something to put on the grill or something to share as a side; bring your picnic blanket and toys and games if you want them, and probably a jacket for possibly unpredictable summer weather.  Wine and beer are fine to bring but, please, no liquor and no glass, per the Park's request.  Friends and guests (including children) are super welcome, so please do bring 'em along.

(7) Saturday, September 28th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Dana Fredsti & David Fitzgerald, Reading, Q & A, and signing for TIME SHARDS: SHATTER WAR - Hometown favorites Dana Fredsti & David Fitzgerald present: SHATTER WAR, the thrilling sequel to TIME SHARDS!  Earth's past, present, and future have shattered in "the Event," yielding a terrifying new world of prehistoric monsters, lost cultures, strange technologies, and displaced armies.  Coming from different points throughout history, a desperate band of survivors join "Merlin," a mysterious figure who may be their only hope to save the world -- if he can be trusted.  When their twenty-third-century ship the Vanuatu is sabotaged by an unknown enemy and thrown far off its course, the team must discover who is responsible, even as they are split apart and fight to survive in the war-torn Shard world. . . .

(8) Sunday, September 29th, 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Reading and signing from THE FUTURE OF ANOTHER TIMELINE by Annalee Newitz.  We're always thrilled to welcome local author Annalee Newitz to the store! Here's some info about the new novel from the publisher: "In a modern-day United States just a step away from our own, time travel is possible -- in fact, it has existed for as long as humanity itself. Jumping into the past is simple, and scientists say that altering the timeline is almost impossible. But Tess, an idealistic geology professor, has figured out how to use time travel to try to undo a horrible injustice in the past whose effects are still being felt in her own time. Meanwhile, in 1992, teenage riot grrl Beth's ordinary life is about to become a tangle of toxic friendship and murder. And across the timeline, a secret war is brewing as a group of men attempt to destroy time travel. If they succeed, only a small elite will have the power to shape past, present, and future. Tess and Beth are part of this hidden war that stretches back millions of years. But with the help of unlikely allies from times past and times yet to come, they may be able to save each other -- and build a different future." We do hope you'll join us to meet Annalee and check out this awesome book!

(9) Wednesday, October 2nd, 6:30 pm (PUBLIC) -- SF in SF (at the American Bookbinders Museum, 355 Clementina, San Francisco) with authors Garth Nix and E. Lily Yu. (Suggested donation $10.)  Doors and bar at 6:00 pm, event begins at 6:30 pm.  A special mid-week SF in SF!  We're so happy to participate in the Science Fiction in San Francisco reading series!  This time we're thrilled to welcome Garth Nix and E. Lily Yu!  The authors will read a selection from their work, followed by Q&A from the audience moderated by Terry Bisson.  Authors will schmooze & sign books after.  Books will be available for sale.  Seating is limited, so first come, first seated.  Bar proceeds benefit the American Bookbinders Museum. Questions? Email sfinsfevents@gmail.com.

(10) Saturday, October 5th at 3:00 pm (PUBLIC) -- Marie Brennan, TURNING DARKNESS INTO LIGHT  - We're always happy to welcome local author Marie Brennan to Borderlands!  Here's the cover copy from her new  novel (featuring Lady Trent's granddaughter!), which she'll be showing off October 5th: "As the renowned granddaughter of Isabella Camherst (Lady Trent, of the riveting and daring Draconic adventure memoirs) Audrey Camherst has always known she, too, would want to make her scholarly mark upon a chosen field of study.  When Lord Gleinleigh recruits Audrey to decipher a series of ancient tablets holding the secrets of the ancient Draconean civilization, she has no idea that her research will plunge her into an intricate conspiracy, one meant to incite rebellion and invoke war. Alongside dearest childhood friend and fellow archeologist Kudshayn, she must find proof of the conspiracy before it's too late.  TURNING DARKNESS INTO LIGHT is a delightful fantasy of manners, the heir to the award-winning Natural History of Dragons series, a perfect stepping stone into an alternate Victorian-esque fantasy landscape."


Further Thoughts about Small and Local Businesses

After publishing the first part of this article, I received a number of comments via email.  The overall content of them supported a conclusion that I had arrived at already but also made me realize that the extent of the problem was larger than I thought.

What I expected was this: the people who wrote me all support local businesses in a conscious and systematic way.  Given the composition of the group that gets these monthly letters, that wasn't a surprise.  After all, you all support Borderlands.

What I didn't expect was how broadly the environment in the Bay Area is hard on local businesses of _all_ types.  I heard from a contractor who mentors high school students and suggests to them that they'd be well advised to look for union work because it's too hard to make a living working as an independent contractor.  I heard from a martial arts instructor who hasn't been able to find a viable space in the East Bay to use for classes.  And I heard about multiple professional chefs who have closed or sold their restaurants and who now work as personal cooks for wealthy individuals.

I don't want to sound too dire, but it seems that San Francisco is turning into a city in which there are only three types of people: employees, managers, and a tiny pool of landlords. I suppose there are children and students as well but, if this goes on, they're just employees and managers to-be.  Damn few of them will ever become landlords or, for that matter, own their own home.  (As a matter of clarification: even the CEO or Director of the Board of a corporation is only a manager.  "Ownership" almost never clearly attaches to an individual.)  Imagine that: no business owners.  Just employees reporting to managers who report to other managers who eventually report to a top manager who then reports to a pool of "owners" who are profoundly uninvolved with what happens at the company week-to-week or even month-to-month.

And, I fear, this is a pattern that is happening all over the country.  Just not as fast as in San Francisco.

What to do?

More specifically, what to do at an individual and local level?  There are bigger movements taking place (Ecommerce, corporate mergers and acquisitions, reduced enforcement of anti-trust laws, limited appetite for labor protections, and so on) but that's far outside the scope of what I feel qualified to discuss.

The first thing is to support local businesses.  But you all know that and are doing it to the degree that works for you.  I'm not going to spend much time on that topic except to point out two things:

1)  Supporting local business doesn't mean turning your life inside-out to _only_ shop local.  For most people, shopping exclusively at local businesses is just not practical.  And not just in terms of cost; there are some sorts of businesses that just don't exist locally anymore (or they're hard to find and hard to get to).  For example, I go to Walgreens for prescription drugs because there are no local pharmacies anywhere near me.  The goal should be to shop local _first_.  Make local businesses your preferred choice.  That's all you've got to do.

2)  The foregoing is especially important to keep in mind because the other part of supporting local businesses is encouraging other people to do so.  All of you reading this already know why it's important to shop and spend local.  You might be able to make small changes to your habits, but you've already had most of the effect you're going to have.  But, if you can get other people to do it to, that makes a difference (possibly a big difference).  I'm not suggesting that you start shaming your friends for going to Starbucks or for shopping at Amazon. That'll just make you a jerk.  But, you can point out to them that shifting their habits even a little bit matters.  Local businesses are generally pretty small-scale operations.  One extra full table a night can make or break a restaurant.  One more hardcover book sold every day would pay our insurance at Borderlands.  You get the idea.

But, as we've seen over the past years, it doesn't seem that individuals making an effort to support local business is going to be enough.  That idea has been around for a while now and it hasn't fixed the problem.  Perhaps more education about it might make the difference but, at this point, I doubt it.

I believe that what it's going to take is for government and our elected officials to put their money where their mouths are; make the health and viability of local business a real priority rather than something that is merely given lip-service.

On a nuts-and-bolts level, what would that be like?  Here's one suggestion, but it's far from the only way.

First, define what "local" and "small" business means.  Let's say that "local" means that it is either physically within San Francisco or, if it doesn't have a physical location (think contractors and gardeners), the majority owner of the business resides in San Francisco.  "Small" can be based on annual gross receipts and should probably vary by business type (for example, a small landscaping company probably has lower expenses relative to its income than a mid-sized restaurant).  However, here's a hint -- the reasonable gross receipts threshold for a "small" business that maintains a physical location and a staff (for example, a corner store, a restaurant or a bookstore) is likely in the millions of dollars.  The expenses for a business like that are shockingly high in SF right now and not likely to go down much.  Which means that two million dollars in annual sales doesn't actually represent either much profit or that a business is particularly large.  I don't want to spend much time getting into minute detail about the math here but, if you doubt me, drop me a note and I'll put together an explanation for you.

(Fun fact - as of 2018, the small business exemption threshold for payroll tax was $300,000.  That's roughly the payroll for 11 employees working full time at _minimum_ wage.  When the cafe was open, we often edged close to that limit and one year we passed it.  The gross receipts threshold was $1,120,000.  I'm pretty sure that most of the corner stores in San Francisco do that much business in a year.  If a business is over either of those thresholds, it has to pay tax.)

Keep the two qualifications separate.  Just because a business isn't "small", the fact that it's "local" still matters.

Then, make doing business easier, faster, and less expensive in any way possible.  Every delay, problem, and expense makes running a business more difficult, especially if it's a small one, because at the end the cost is paid with the same resources -- time and energy.

(A side note: if you're serious about accomplishing that, don't make those goals something that "should be taken into consideration" by a department whose main job is doing something else, like planning, issuing permits, levying taxes and so forth.  Make it someone's job to do nothing other than make things better for local businesses.  Hopefully several "someones", or even an actual office.  And no, the SF Department of Small Business is not it -- not enough power and not enough information.)

Here are some specific examples:

Easier:
Dedicated assistance with building permits
A local commercial parking permit exempting the holder from parking meter fees and residential street parking time limits
Assistance with city tax returns, especially business property tax returns
Free legal advice, especially on commercial leases and disputes

Faster:
Accelerated review of conditional use permits (they can take 9-12 months and you can't really start without _already_ having a signed lease)
A one-stop registration center for new businesses, including highly informed advisors
Something similar to the existing 311 service to act as a clearing house specifically for small business concerns and questions

Less Expensive:
Fee waivers for any and all city fees, be they construction permits, business licenses, sign permits, health department permits, and so on.
Reduced or eliminated taxes for payroll/gross receipts and business property (there are exemptions for the payroll/gross receipts taxes but they are too low - i.e. corner stores often have to pay them despite the exemption)
Reduced electrical fees from the city-owned electrical generation system

That is just a short, off-the-top of my head list.  I'm sure that there are many other and better ideas that could be implemented.  I'm also positive that I'm completely failed to consider problems that are major issues for other type of businesses, since I can only view this from the perspective of a bookseller.

Granted, some of these ideas would cost money.  Moreso, some of them would deprive the city of income.  But, local business are a truly tiny part of the commercial environment in San Francisco (or any other city, for that matter).  That's part of the problem that we face - little of the money that moves around the city even touches us.  I suspect that there are single companies in SF that produce more revenue for the city than all the small local businesses put together.  Waiving parking meter income or the $375 in business property tax I paid this year . . . it's just a tiny, tiny drop in the bucket compared to SF's annual budget (12.3 billion dollars for 2019).  I have a hard time believing that, for example, giving every contractor who lives in SF free parking would make any damn difference at all to the bottom line.  So why not do it?  Even if it pinches the city's budget; wouldn't you prefer that the budget get pinched by supporting local business than by any of the other dumb-ass things that money gets wasted on?

In closing, for all that small businesses represent just a tiny slice of the commercial activity in a city, we do so much to give the city its character, shape, and reputation.  City Lights Bookstore, Cafe Trieste, Twin Peaks Tavern, the whole of Chinatown, Foreign Cinema, Body Manipulations, The DNA Lounge, The Pork Store Cafe, Arizmendi Bakery, Bi Rite . . . the list goes on and on.  On a profound level, local businesses are what define San Francisco for both we who live here and for those who visit.

Beyond the many social and financial benefits that local businesses bring -- can you imagine what SF (or New York, Portland, or even Chapel Hill, North Carolina) would be like if even half of the local businesses were to close and be replaced by their national chain substitutes?

I don't even want to imagine what that would be like.  And I really, really don't want to see it happen.